Tysons Corner, VA - Capital One, Mitre, Northrop Grumman, Intelsat and Microstrategy

So yesterday as I was driving home from the Shenandoah Valley, I made several stops along the Washington, DC Beltway. I had noticed on my trip down the major Capital One complex at Tysons Corner. George Overholser was one of the co-founders of the credit card company and went on to establish the Non-profit Finance Fund (data-driven NGOs and Philanthropy) and Third Sector Capital Partners (pilot pay for success projects).

You can read about that here: Silicon Valley: A Laboratory of “Smart” Surveillance and Privatization – Wrench in the Gears

When I was making my map I noticed that Mitre corporation (nano, cyber, Medicaid Innovation) was right next door, so I decided to do my livestream from there. When I got to the site it turns out Northrup Grumman was next to that and I could see across the highway the tower for Intelsat, a pioneer satellite communications firm.

In the comments @leo made the important note that Microstrategy is also in Tyson’s Corner. In fact it is right next to Intelsat. Leo had written about Michael Saylor and Microstrategy back in the fall, and I was just revisiting it again, now that I have more context. Turns out Microstrategy and Northrop Grumman have been working together. See the quote below.

“MicroStrategy perceived this trend and offers digital identification products and services directed towards the government. They developed a mobile application named Usher working in partnership with Northrop Grumman, one of the world’s largest weapons manufacturers with annual revenues exceeding $30 Billion. Usher provides biometric and location based authorization and also tracks the user to provide: …critical back-end information on user behavior and resource usage…

You’ll want to look at the history of Intelsat, which was started as an international project by JFK in 1961. While the administrative headquarters is in Tysons Corner, VA, the corporate headquarters is in Luxembourg (@leo). Intelsat - Wikipedia.

Livestream at Mitre

Livestream at Capital One (short)

Read the comments on this one - some interesting insights into the esoteric elements of the art installation at Capital One. @Stephers @jenlake

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Really interesting @AMcD, its a special energy to go and do what your doing.

MicroStrategy owns 129,218 bitcoin, still largest holding of any public company I guess.

at 20,000usd/1btc thats 2.5 billions dollars worth of btc, about 0.6% of total bitcoin.

Also Saylor build MicroStrategy first working for DuPont as a consultant building simulations for business strategy.

Principle partner with Facebook building the early days of social media data mining for advertisement profiles/military intelligence.

Considering DuPonts involvement in the Manhattan project, interesting throughline. building/managing oakridge

Over interesting connections between what Allison is showing and the article

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I posted “Capital One Part Two” to my “Giving Trees” post at POM. Wow. What an installation - representing the strangling of life, and propelling life into a counterfeit abomination. This is disheartening to say the least.

Much gratitude to you, my dear friend, for exposing this and helping us to grasp the meaning and implications. What a week you’ve had.

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You are wonderful Alison, thank you for showing us what it takes! There is no lie in your fire! Don’t worry, I love your production style. It is real. Continue with what you are doing and do not add one spec of magenta.
Yes, you are absolutely right, we do not want our kids to be managers to this monstrosity.
Peace to you :heart: :pray:

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Great article Leo, Thanks.

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Charles Bukowski could see it like you Alison.

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Leaving this as a placeholder for now (will circle back), as atmospheric physicist S. Fred Singer (AKA Siegfried Singer) worked for Mitre at one time - as well the Upper Atmosphere Rocket Program at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Singer has worked as a consultant for several government agencies, including the House Select Committee on Space, NASA, the Government Accountability Office, the National Science Foundation, the United States Atomic Energy Commission, National Research Council, the Department of Defense Strategic Defense Initiative, Department of Energy Nuclear Waste Panel, and the Department of the Treasury. Other clients have included the states of Virginia, Alaska, and Pennsylvania. In the private sector he has worked for Mitre Corp., GE, Ford, General Motors; during the late 1970s Singer consulted with Exxon, Shell, Unocal Sun Oil, and ARCO on oil pricing; and Lockheed Martin, Martin�Marietta, McDonnell-Douglas, ANSER, and IBM on space research. He has also advised the Independent Institute, the American Council on Science and Health, and Frontiers of Freedom.

In a January 1960 presentation to the American Physical Society, Singer sketched out his vision of what the environment around the earth might consist of, extending up to 40,000 miles (64,000 km) into space. He became known for his early predictions about the properties of the electrical particles trapped around the earth, which were partly verified by later discoveries in satellite experiments. In December 1960, he suggested the existence of a shell of visible dust particles around the earth some 600 to 1,000 miles (1,600 km) in space, beyond which there was a layer of smaller particles, a micrometre or less in diameter, extending 2,000 to 4,000 miles (6,400 km). In March 1961 Singer and another University of Maryland physicist, E. J. Opik, were given a $97,000 grant by NASA to conduct a three-year study of interplanetary gas and dust.

### Singer:

I’m not sure I can answer your question directly but let me try. I think there were no ionospheric physicists as such. They were ionospheric propagation experts. That is to say they came from the point of view of radio propagation and electrical engineering rather than from the point of view of the physics of the ionosphere. For example my own work, the work on ionospheric currents was virtually unknown to these people because it didn’t affect radio propagation.

### DeVorkin:

That is quite interesting.

### Needell:

But of course it was known to the people who were interested in terrestrial magnetism.

### Singer:

Of course, yes.

### DeVorkin:

But it was cited. I have a citation pattern for your Singer, Maple and Bowen plus the Nature, the JGR and the Nature papers here because I was interested in this point. You see it’s bimodal. It peaks in '53, '54, peaks again in '60, '61.

### Singer:

Well you know why?

### DeVorkin:

That’s another question but tell me why first.

### Singer:

Quite simple. It’s because that subject was taken up again experimentally with rockets at the beginning of the space age. Funds became available to various people in the United States. At the University of New Hampshire people essentially repeated the measurements we had made and found that indeed the current was there and from then on lots of people started to measure the current. And they usually went back and quoted the original papers.

### DeVorkin:

So that makes sense for the bimodal distribution. Malsey [phonetic] and Bestein [phonetic] and Newell and Mayer [phonetic], Van Allen did cite you. So at least the one exception is Massey but he seemed to be the biggest advocate for rocketry anyway.

### Singer:

Yes. Massey did or did not cite it?

### DeVorkin:

He did.

### Singer:

You said the biggest exception.

### DeVorkin:

He was in the same group of British physicists who were interested in the upper atmosphere, whereas all these other fellows did not cite you for the reason you gave.

### Singer:

The radio propagation people, that is correct. Yes. I had not realized that they did not cite me but of course I’m not surprised because it didn’t affect their work.

https://groups.google.com/g/alt.global-warming/c/sn2RFq-yCDI

S. Fred Singer: A 1960s Trailblazer for Satellite Remote Sensing

His doctoral thesis was titled, “The density spectrum and latitude dependence of extensive cosmic ray air showers .”[21] His supervisor was John Archibald Wheeler, and his thesis committee included J. Robert Oppenheimer and Niels Bohr.[22]

After his masters, Singer joined the armed forces, working for the United States Navy on mine warfare and countermeasures from 1944 until 1946. While with the Naval Ordnance Laboratory he developed an arithmetic element for an electronic digital calculator that he called an “electronic brain”. He was discharged in 1946 and joined the Upper Atmosphere Rocket Program at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Silver Spring, Maryland, working there until 1950. He focused on ozone, cosmic rays, and the ionosphere, all measured using balloons and rockets launched from White Sands, New Mexico, or from ships out at sea. Rachel White Scheuering writes that for one mission to launch a rocket, he sailed with a naval operation to the Arctic, and also conducted rocket launching from ships at the equator.[9]

From 1950 to 1953, he was attached to the U.S. Embassy in London as a scientific liaison officer with the Office of Naval Research, where he studied research programs in Europe into cosmic radiation and nuclear physics.[23] While there, he was one of eight delegates with a background in guided weapons projects to address the Fourth International Congress of Astronautics in Zurich in August 1953, at a time when, as The New York Timesreported, most scientists saw space flight as thinly disguised science fiction.[24]

### 1951: Design of early satellites[edit]

Singer’s MOUSE satellite, which he designed in the early 1950s.[25]

Singer was one of the first scientists to urge the launching of earth satellites for scientific observation during the 1950s.[26] In 1951 or 1952 he proposed the MOUSE (“Minimal Orbital Unmanned Satellite, Earth”), a 100 pounds (45 kg) satellite that would contain Geiger counters for measuring cosmic rays, photo cells for scanning the Earth, telemetry electronics for sending data back to Earth, a magnetic data storage device, and rudimentary solar energy cells. Although MOUSE never flew, the Baltimore News-Post reported in 1957 that had Singer’s arguments about the need for satellites been heeded, the U.S. could have beaten Russia by launching the first earth satellite.[25] He also proposed (along with R. C. Wentworth) that satellite measurement of ultraviolet backscatter could be used as a method to measure atmospheric ozone profiles.[27] This technique was later used on early weather satellites.[28]

Singer moved back to the United States in 1953, where he took up an associate professorship in physics at the University of Maryland, and at the same time served as the director of the Center for Atmospheric and Space Physics. Scheuering writes that his work involved conducting experiments on rockets and satellites, remote sensing, radiation belts, the magnetosphere, and meteorites. He developed a new method of launching rockets into space: firing them from a high-flying plane, both with and without a pilot. The Navy adopted the idea and Singer supervised the project. He received a White House Special Commendation from President Eisenhower in 1954 for his work.[9]

He became one of 12 board members of the American Astronautical Society, an organization formed in 1954 to represent the country’s 300 leading scientists and engineers in the area of guided missiles—he was one of seven members of the board to resign in December 1956 after a series of disputes about the direction and control of the group.[29]

In November 1957 Singer and other scientists at the university successfully designed and fired three new “Oriole” rockets off the Virginia Capes. The rockets weighed less than 25 pounds (11 kg) and could be built for around $2000. Fired from a converted Navy LSM, they could reach an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,000 m) and had a complete telemetry system to send back information on cosmic, ultraviolet and X-rays. Singer said that the firings placed “the exploration of outer space with high altitude rockets on the same basis, cost-wise and effort-wise, as low atmosphere measurements with weather balloons. From now on, we can fire thousands of these rockets all over the world with very little cost.”[30]

In February 1958, when he was head of the cosmic ray group of the University of Maryland’s physics department, he received a special commendation from President Eisenhower for “outstanding achievements in the development of satellites for scientific purposes.”[31][32] In April 1958, he was appointed as a consultant to the House Select Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration, which was preparing to hold hearings on President Eisenhower’s proposal for a new agency to handle space research, and a month later received the Ohio State University’s Distinguished Alumnus Award.[33] He became a full professor at Maryland in 1959, and was chosen that year by the United States Junior Chamber of Commerce as one of the country’s ten outstanding young men.[34]

In a January 1960 presentation to the American Physical Society, Singer sketched out his vision of what the environment around the earth might consist of, extending up to 40,000 miles (64,000 km) into space.[35] He became known for his early predictions about the properties of the electrical particles trapped around the earth, which were partly verified by later discoveries in satellite experiments. In December 1960, he suggested the existence of a shell of visible dust particles around the earth some 600 to 1,000 miles (1,600 km) in space, beyond which there was a layer of smaller particles, a micrometre or less in diameter, extending 2,000 to 4,000 miles (6,400 km).[36] In March 1961 Singer and another University of Maryland physicist, E. J. Opik, were given a $97,000 grant by NASA to conduct a three-year study of interplanetary gas and dust.[37]

https://www.drroyspencer.com/2015/09/s-fred-singer-a-1960s-trailblazer-for-satellite-remote-sensing/

Jos says:

September 19, 2015 at 2:26 PM

He also pioneered in satellite remote sensing of stratospheric ozone, paving the way for probably the longest satellite-based record of an important atmospheric parameter.

He did that even before the first satellite ever was launched (paper from June 1957)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JZ062i002p00299/full

Singer led the nation’s satellite program, and…publicly supported Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative on behalf of a conservative think tank called the George C. Marshall Institute.

Synchronously, here is Alison’s photo posted today from her Shenandoah/Beltway field trip (statue of George C. Marshall):


https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/JZ055i002p00115

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