Tokenized Behavior Change Article January 2022

This seriously makes me want to curl up in a ball and cry. This is everything I’ve been warning about.

"As blockchain-based tokens are increasingly adopted to target social outcomes, it is important to properly define these activities as “behavior change interventions” and assess their design and management as such—otherwise, there is significant risk of possible unintended consequences. Designing tokens as behavior change interventions requires new constructs beyond those currently in use to model the interdependence of digital and social ecosystems, and integration of token engineering, cryptoeconomics, and behavioral skill sets to test token designs within various ecosystems. "

" These gaps highlight the need for greater consideration of behavioral science in the interaction of ledger, tokenized, and digital ecosystem, with cryptotokens as the technological bridge between the two (Tan, 2021). If cryptotokens are to be adopted as tools that can contribute to achieving the SDGs, they must leverage desired behaviors in an ethical, efficient, and sustainable manner. This paper discusses integration of new interdisciplinary behavioral skill sets, functions, perspectives, and evidence into protocols beyond those currently present in the blockchain and social impact communities."

" Behavior change interventions (BCIs) are understood as “Coordinated sets of activities designed to change specified behavior patterns” (Michie et al., 2011). Numerous cryptotokens fit this definition with some already being used as behavior change tools. This potentially results in significant opportunity cost and risk due to a lack of behavioral insight in current design and management practices."

I think they are using the acronym BCI (behavior change intervention) because it is the same as brain-computer interface.

Panagora - Silver Spring, MD

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Michael Cooper, Director, Monitoring, Evaluation, Research, Learning, and Adaptation

Michael Cooper brings 16 years of experience in MEL, adaptive management, and information and communications technologies for development (ICT4D) to his role as MERLA director at Panagora Group. Michael has led numerous evaluations, studies and trainings for USAID, UN agencies and the World Bank. He completed an associateship with the Pulte Institute for Global Development at Notre Dame on the use of data science methods in decision-making for social impact. This decision-making focus is reflective of his interest in actionable evaluation and behavior change strategies. He actively publishes on the implications of blockchain technology on social impact, data sovereignty and innovations in methods. Michael previously worked at the U.S. State Department as a planning and evaluation advisor to U.S. Embassies and USAID Missions in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh. He also held the position of associate director for policy and evaluation with the Millennium Challenge Corporation, where he worked with the CDC on various WASH evaluations and managed MCC evaluations, planning and program design in Mongolia, Nepal, Morocco, Zambia, Niger and Mali. Michael earned an M.A. from the University of Denver and has since earned several certificates in evaluation and data science from George Washington University.

BETSY BASSAN

Betsy Bassan is the President and CEO of Panagora Group, a woman- and employee-owned small business she founded in 2011. Panagora provides novel solutions in health, development, and learning with a focus on using highly participatory approaches. Betsy brings over 30 years of experience as an innovator in the international development field. Over the last 10 years, Betsy has grown Panagora into a 180-person company working in and supporting 55 countries with a robust portfolio and a proven track record of excellence. The company was named Small Business of the Year for FY2018 by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Panagora’s main client.

Betsy is a leader in her industry and is recognized as a successful entrepreneur outside of it. She is a 2021 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year for the Mid-Atlantic region and a 2020 Enterprising Woman of the Year Awardee for her leadership and mentorship of other women entrepreneurs. As an indication of her expertise and leadership, Panagora was on Inc. Magazine’s list of “5,000 Fastest-Growing Private Companies in America” twice; in 2019 and 2020, we ranked in the top 10 percent and top 20 percent respectively. Panagora also ranked number 12 on the Women Presidents’ Organization list of “50 Fastest Growing Women-Owned and Led Companies” in 2020.

Betsy has decades of hands-on regional experience working across Africa, Asia, Europe and Eurasia, and the Middle East, and across a variety of sectors, including global health, private sector development, environment, democracy/governance, and organizational development. During her career, she has held various executive and leadership positions, where she led many strategic initiatives and innovative programs to provide services to people in need around the world.

She has also held several key industry leadership positions among the major professional, advocacy, and trade associations in the international development sector. Through the USGLC, a membership-based foreign aid advocacy group, Betsy helped build support for critical foreign aid programs. As Program Vice President and then Chair of the Society for International Development-Washington D.C., a leading professional association, she greatly enhanced its profile as the “the public square of development” through cutting-edge knowledge exchange.

As an industry leader who has developed novel approaches to address major global health challenges, Betsy also works tirelessly to elevate the voice of small business in international development. Through the Panagora platform, Betsy led the founding of the Council for International Development Companies (CIDC) and, as chair, transformed the Small Business Association for International Companies (SBAIC) over three pivotal years from an informal network into a registered and recognized advocate.

She lived overseas for seven years in Kenya and Sudan, where she worked for a variety of NGOs and USAID missions. She holds an M.A. from Columbia University in New York City, where she completed a joint degree program (Planning in Developing Nations) in the School of International Affairs and the Division of Urban Planning; and a B.A. cum laude from St. John’s College, Great Books Program, in Annapolis, Maryland. She speaks French. Betsy has three children: Madeleine, Rebecca, and Ben.

Now more than ever, each scarce development dollar must drive innovation, build capacity, and create lasting impact.

BETSY BASSAN, CEO
Industry Leadership

Betsy has held a host of industry leadership positions among the leading professional, advocacy, trade associations in our space. Through the USGLC, a membership-based foreign aid advocacy group, Betsy helped build support for critical foreign aid programs. As Program Vice President and then Chair of the Society for International Development-Washington D.C., a leading professional association, she greatly enhanced its profile as the “the public square of development” through cutting-edge knowledge exchange.

As an industry leader who has developed novel approaches to major global health problems, Betsy also works tirelessly to elevate the voice of small business in international development. Through the Panagora platform, Betsy led the founding of the Council for International Development Companies (CIDC) and, as chair, transformed the Small Business Association for International Companies (SBAIC) over three pivotal years from an informal network into a registered and recognized advocate.

IN HEALTH, MS. BASSAN HAS INNOVATED OVER THE YEARS IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

  • Integrated health and health systems strengthening in low-resource and conflict-affected areas
  • TB in the private sector
  • HIV/AIDS capacity-building
  • Total market approaches for incentivizing sustainable private sector participation in health commodity manufacture and distribution
  • Grant financing to build sustainable capacity among local organizations to carry out technical work and manage donor funds
  • Public-private partnerships for sustainable workplace clinics for workers, their families, and surrounding communities
  • Champion collaborative approach wherein communities and health clinics join forces to reach dramatic and measurable health outcomes
  • Multisectoral approaches to health care to expand coverage and benefits from health investments
  • Social franchising of services and whole clinics, including helping conceive and create the world’s largest social franchise
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@AMcD . . . And there is that Vienna signature that you have been tracking . . .

  • 3Research Institute for Cryptoeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria

https://bach.wu.ac.at/d/research/organization/4030/