Close Encounters

I was just typing the text below, and this scene came to mind.

AMcD: Sure. I feel a need to help people begin to wrap their minds around ubiquitous computing, the virtual structure you mention which will be the Open Metaverse with a smart contract layer. Regular people need to understand that the technicians who put that layer into place are attempting game nature, including humans, into becoming an armature for new forms of life that may present as photonic information.

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Watched some world cup rugby today, which is something I rarely do. Might have watch 15 minutes. That was enough! Not a sports fan. Of course magenta and emerald green were there. Bill board lights a flashing with the usual light suspects and magenta referees. Just wondering if the games are scheduled at night as much as possible so LED stadium lights can be used on the unaware. Excellent opportunity to light spell the spectators with a little photonic information.
Sport and music venues would be idealy suited.
Here is the game

Musco makes these new aged LED lights for stadiums and I think are set up to install LEDs for communities getting sucked in to the Dark sky Principles.
My gut feeling is that they know all about photonic information.

I think Dark Sky Principles being pumped in communities is the same concept using the same spell bounding photonic LED lights as in the stadiums.

International Dark Sky Association pumps dark sky principles hard.

IDA Board member Brad Schlesselman is a Senior Research Engineer with Musco Lighting. Interesting!

What do you think [quote=“Gino, post:2, topic:225, full:true”]
Watched some world cup rugby today. Of course magenta and emerald green were there. Bill board lights a flashing with the usual light suspects and magenta referees. Just wondering if the games are scheduled at night as much as possible so LED stadium lights can be used on the unaware. Excellent opportunity to light spell the spectators with a little photonic information.
Sport and music venues would be idealy suited.
Here is the game

Musco makes these new aged LED lights for stadiums and I think are set up to install LEDs for communities getting sucked in to the Dark sky Principles.
My gut feeling is that they know all about photonic information.

I think Dark Sky Principles being pumped in communities is the same concept using the same spell bounding photonic LED lights as in the stadiums.

International Dark Sky Association pumps dark sky principles hard.

IDA Board member Brad Schlesselman is a Senior Research Engineer with Musco Lighting. Interesting!

What do you think Alison, am I way off in left field with this one?

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It is interesting that you raise this @Gino, as I am reminded in the first chapter of Vernor Vinge’s “Rainbows End” the YGBM (You Gotta Believe Me) mind virus made its first appearance at a stadium soccer game.

I would not be surprised AMcD, that stadiums, street lights and of course that useless little box in the living room would be used as ideal portals for photonic information to put people in a spell, or possibly even changing body chemistry. Just saying!

Wireless data from every light bulb


Li-Fi (also written as LiFi) is a wireless communication technology which utilizes light to transmit data and position between devices. The term was first introduced by Harald Haas during a 2011 TEDGlobal talk in Edinburgh.[1] Li-Fi is a light communication system that is capable of transmitting data at high speeds over the visible light, ultraviolet, and infrared spectrums. In its present state, only LED lamps can be used for the transmission of data in visible light.[2]

In terms of its end user, the technology is similar to Wi-Fi — the key technical difference being that Wi-Fi uses radio frequency to induce a voltage in an antenna to transmit data, whereas Li-Fi uses the modulation of light intensity to transmit data. Li-Fi is able to function in areas otherwise susceptible to electromagnetic interference (e.g. aircraft cabins, hospitals, or the military).[3]

Bg-Fi is a Li-Fi system consisting of an application for a mobile device, and a simple consumer product, like an IoT (Internet of Things) device, with color sensor, microcontroller, and embedded software. Light from the mobile device display communicates to the color sensor on the consumer product, which converts the light into digital information. Light-emitting diodes enable the consumer product to communicate synchronously with the mobile device… Researchers have reached data rates of over 224 Gbit/s,[16] which was much faster than typical fast broadband in 2013.[17][18] Li-Fi is expected to be ten times cheaper than Wi-Fi.[19] The first commercially available Li-Fi system was presented at the 2014 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.[20]

Professor Harald Haas, Professor of Mobile Communications at the University of Edinburgh, coined the term “Li-Fi” at his 2011 TED Global Talk where he introduced the idea of “wireless data from every light”.[23]

The general term “visible light communication” (VLC), whose history dates back to the 1880s, includes any use of the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to transmit information. The D-Light project at Edinburgh’s Institute for Digital Communications was funded from January 2010 to January 2012.[24] Haas helped start a company to market it.[25]

In October 2011, a research organisation Fraunhofer IPMS and industry Companies formed the Li-Fi Consortium, to promote high-speed optical wireless systems and to overcome the limited amount of radio-based wireless spectrum available by exploiting a completely different part of the electromagnetic spectrum.[26]

VLC technology was exhibited in 2012 using Li-Fi.[27] By August 2013, data rates of over 1.6 Gbit/s were demonstrated over a single color LED.[28] In September 2013, a press release said that Li-Fi, or VLC systems in general, do not require line-of-sight conditions.[29] In October 2013, it was reported Chinese manufacturers were working on Li-Fi development kits.[30]

In April 2014, the Russian company Stins Coman announced the development of a Li-Fi wireless local network called BeamCaster. Their current module transfers data at 1.25 gigabytes per second (GB/s) but they foresee boosting speeds up to 5 GB/s in the near future.[31] In 2014 a new record was established by Sisoft (a Mexican company) that was able to transfer data at speeds of up to 10 GB/s across a light spectrum emitted by LED lamps.[32]

In July 2015, IEEE operated the APD in Geiger-mode as a single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) to increase the efficiency of energy-usage and makes the receiver even more sensitive.[33] This operation could also be performed as quantum-limited sensitivity that makes receivers able to detect weak signals from a far distance.[34]

In June 2018, Li-Fi passed a test by a BMW plant in Munich for operating in an industrial environment.[35]

in August 2018, Kyle Academy, a secondary school in Scotland, had pilot the use of Li-Fi within the school. Students are able to receive data through a connection between their laptop computers and a USB device that is able to translate the rapid on-off current from the ceiling LEDs into data.[36]

In June 2019, French company Oledcomm tested their Li-Fi technology at the 2019 Paris Air Show.

…Many experts foresee a movement towards Li-Fi in homes because it has the potential for faster speeds and its security benefits with how the technology works. Because the light sends the data, the network can be contained in a single physical room or building reducing the possibility of a remote network attack. Though this has more implications in enterprise and other sectors, home usage may be pushed forward with the rise of home automation that requires large volumes of data to be transferred through the local network…

Vehicles could communicate with one another via front and back lights to increase road safety. Street lights and traffic signals could also provide information about current road situations… Street lamps can be used to display advertisements for nearby businesses or attractions on cellular devices as an individual passes through. A customer walking into a store and passing through the store’s front lights can show current sales and promotions on the customer’s cellular device…

[Mar 26, 2010] “Just five years ago, scientists at Stanford University discovered that neurons injected with a photo-sensitive gene from algae could be turned on or off with the flip of a light switch. This discovery has since turned hundreds of labs onto the young field of optogenetics. Today researchers around the world are using these genetic light switches to control specific neurons in live animals… To date, scientists have mainly concentrated on two light switches, or opsins, to activate or inhibit neurons. The first, channelrhodopsin, is a protein found in the cell membranes of green algae. When exposed to blue light, these proteins open membrane channels, letting in sodium and calcium ions. When genetically engineered into mammalian neurons, these proteins cause similar ion influxes, activating neurons. The second light switch, an ion pump called halorhodopsin, lets in chloride ions in response to yellow light, silencing the neuron…” Light Switches for Neurons | MIT Technology Review

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Wow - there you go. That’s the reason behind all the LED street light installations. That and their crazy opto-genetic plans.

@jenlake when I was out for a walk in the part last week, I heard a ‘flag post’ shaking pretty bad and there was no wind that day. I have been thinking that most flag posts, lamps posts etc are really antennas for 5G/6G and I was right when I found the name plate of the company making these posts. They are called Nova Pole.

Nova Pole is a Vancouver based company that focuses on street post/flag post installations and they are all over place. They have a data sheet of the 5G technology used in their lamp posts

I also just finished reading Elana Freeland’s chapter on light in her book on Geoengineering Transhumanism, and how LEDs are going to be used to gather and track our data, as well as transmit thoughts that aren’t ours into our minds.

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Reminds me of “Super Sad True Love Story.”

" Technology and Digital Privacy, by Stella Kossivas © 2015

In Super Sad True Love Story, Gary Shteyngart presents a near-future dystopian world in which the information that we would normally regard as private is in fact available for public consumption. This information is accessible through the use of an “äppärät” device where one is able to gauge a vast amount of information on a person. Shteyngart’s dystopian future also has “Credit Poles” that “[register] your Credit ranking as you [walk] by” (54), and then publically display the number for those in your immediate surroundings to see. This immediate access to personal information is crucial in Shteyngart’s world. Where we might use body language and conversation to interpret someone in our world, the abundance of social information available on the äppärät is essential to interacting with another person and understanding who they are in Shteyngart’s dystopia. Additionally, the implications of such a transparent device in relation to a person’s privacy results in certain social norms and interesting consequences when these devices shut down for a period of time."

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